ROUND TABLE CHURCH (words by Fred Kaan)          

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On this page you may view a Sample Image of the melody and listen to an Audio Sample. Lyrics and Author / Composer Comments are below.

one verse played on piano by Ron Klusmeier.

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MELODY LINE VERSIONS

  • Vocal (or ’C’ Instrument)
  • C Instrument 8va
  • Bb Instrument
  • Eb Instrument
  • F Instrument (high)
  • F Instrument (low)
  • Bass Clef ’C’ Instrument
  • Viola (alto clef)
  • Bulletin Master

HYMN-STYLE
HARMONIZATIONS

  • SATB Vocal Parts

ACCOMPANIMENT
VERSIONS

  • Piano

Audio Sample

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Sample Image

Sample image

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Lyrics

The church is like a table,
a table that is round.
It has no sides or corners,
no first or last, no honours;
here people are in one-ness
and love together bound.

The church is like a table
set in an open house;
no protocol for seating,
a symbol of inviting,
of sharing, drinking, eating;
an end to ‘them’ and ‘us’.

The church is like a table,
a table for a feast
to celebrate the healing
of all excluded-feeling,
(while Christ is serving, kneeling,
a towel around his waist).

The church is like a table
where every head is crowned.
As guests of God created,
all are to each related;
the whole world is awaited
to make the circle round.

Author / Composer Comments

• Author Fred Kaan, from his book The Only Earth We Know (Stainer & Bell / Hope Publishing Co., 1999, page 54): “I wrote this text on the 7:40 am train from Coventry to London on December 14, 1984. It owes its inspiration to a poem by Chuck Lathrop, a former missioner in the Appalachian Mountains.”

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