A QUESTIONING SONG (words by Walter Farquharson)

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On this page you may view a Sample Image of the melody and listen to an Audio Sample. Lyrics and Author / Composer Comments are below.

The Audio Sample below is one verse played on piano by Ron Klusmeier.

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  • C Instrument 8va
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HYMN-STYLE
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Audio Sample

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Lyrics

Where are you, God?
I want to know!
Away up high or far below?
Behind a star or in the grass,
are you a solid, liquid, or gas?

Where are you, God?
Can you be found
in farthest space or on the ground?
I need to know if I’m to pray,
if I’m to believe in you today.

Author / Composer Comments

From Ron & Walter’s “JUST LIKE SALT” collection:

Where is God? Does God know what we do? Does God really care? It is important to help children articulate their questions and to listen carefully to them. Some may seem serious, some humorous, but often children cover more serious questions with a joke when they are unsure of how others might react. Having listened carefully to the questions, it is just as important to hear the answers children give to their own questions — or to the questions asked by their friends.

In Jesus’ day, some people thought God lived only in the temple in Jerusalem. They wondered if God could hear their prayers when they were far away from Jerusalem. Some thought God lived only on the holy mountain! (John 4:19-26)

Some children may think God lives in the sky or in a church building or some other far away place. Adult images of God may be equally restricted or limited. Paul said that God lives in us, and we are God’s temple. (1 Corinthians 3:16-17)

Often, people in Scripture stories had questions about where God was, but just as frequently they had questions about why God did or didn’t do certain things. There were many things people didn’t understand and for which they sought explanations. Sometimes their questions came when they were hurting or angry about their present situation. Some useful examples of these types of situations can be found in the following Bible verses:

Job 3:1-12;

Psalms 22, 137, 140;

Luke 22:39-46; and

Matthew 27:45-46

As human beings, we need to know that God is more expansive than our questions or our answers. Even the names we use in referring to God are too limiting.

Therefore questions should be encouraged rather than stifled. We can only appreciate the mystery of God as we move beyond easy, static answers. Neat and tidy descriptions of who God is, or how God works only serve to create ‘boxes’ in which to keep God and others within our control.

Questioning does not indicate lack of faith, but rather, growth in faith. Lack of faith occurs when we live as if God is non-existent and makes no difference to life. Growth occurs when we are not satisfied with easy answers, when we continue to question and seek new explanations, and when we strive to broaden our under-standing of God and God’s ways. Each question and subsequent search for a new answer is another step forward on the faith journey to which all of us are called.

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